New Technical Qualifications opening up a world of choice for 14 – 19s

Young people will soon have more choice when selecting their 14 -19 educational options after 95 new City & Guilds Technical Qualifications at Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 were approved by the Department for Education (DfE).

23 February 2017 / Be the first to comment

Young people will soon have more choice when selecting their 14 -19 educational options after 95 new City & Guilds Technical Qualifications at Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5 were approved by the Department for Education (DfE).

The announcement means the City & Guilds Technicals will appear alongside GCSEs and A-Levels on performance tables in September 2019. They will be available for teaching across the UK from this September. 

Kirstie Donnelly MBE – MD City & Guilds said: “We are delighted to have had so many of our new levels two and three Technical Qualifications recognised by the DfE. This sends a clear message that Government supports high-quality vocational education and views it as a crucial part of the evolution of the educational landscape as it focusses on better meeting the needs of UK industry.

“Critical to our success was close working with industry throughout the development of our new qualifications to ensure they genuinely develop the skills and aptitudes that their businesses need.”

The Technical Qualifications are a new way of learning for 14 – 19 year olds. Now available in 13 subject areas Technical Qualifications were created to offer a genuine alternative to traditional academic routes and help learners to feel ready for work.

Kirstie continued: “The City & Guilds Technical Qualifications offer vitally important choice at Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5, giving young people the opportunity to choose high-quality professional and technical qualifications that allow them to progress onto the next level of education or straight into work, without closing off any options. Studying for a Technical Qualification also gives young people opportunities to develop the skills and characteristics that are essential for today’s workplace yet still lacking among the majority of young people leaving education.”

Every young person who studies these full-time courses gains the skills needed to progress onto an apprenticeship, higher apprenticeship, further education, or into a job. Crucially they will now also be able to use their qualifications to go on to university, as the higher level Technicals all carry UCAS points and students studying them are able to achieve the equivalent of three A-Levels.

The new City & Guilds Technical Qualifications have been designed with employers and providers to give young people the most up-to-date and relevant technical skills needed for the world of work. They are a fundamental component of the City & Guilds TechBac, a gold-standard curriculum that enables learners to have both the important soft skills recognised as well as the Technical knowledge required to become employed in their sector of their choice.

The qualifications will be available in the following 13 sectors:

- Automotive

- Beauty & Complementary Therapies

- Building Services

- Business

- Construction

- Digital

- Early Years

- Engineering

- Hairdressing

- Health & Social Care

- Hospitality & Catering

- Land & Animal

- Travel & Tourism

To find out more about the City & Guilds TechBac visit the City & Guilds website  http://www.cityandguilds.com/techbac/technical-qualifications/dfe-approved-qualifications

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