Maximising Apprenticeships in Wales

The ‘Maximising the Value of Apprenticeships to Wales’ report is an independent report undertaken by Beyond Standards, on behalf of City & Guilds and the NTfW, who in turn were supported by the City & Guilds National Advisory Committee for Wales. This report offers fresh ideas and a new momentum to the debate about how Wales might provide an exemplary apprenticeships system. City & Guilds have also written a response to the report outlining our recommendations for the Welsh Government and a few calls-to-action.

30 January 2019

Apprenticeships in Wales are at a crossroads; or perhaps beyond. The Welsh Government’s decisions to retain Apprenticeship Frameworks and qualifications rewarding apprentices’ achievements, and not to introduce a voucher scheme enabling employers directly to commission training providers, using money from the UK Apprenticeship Levy, moves Wales decisively away from English precedents.

The ‘Maximising the Value of Apprenticeships to Wales’ report is an independent report undertaken by Beyond Standards, on behalf of City & Guilds and the NTfW, who in turn were supported by the City & Guilds National Advisory Committee for Wales. This report offers fresh ideas and a new momentum to the debate about how Wales might provide an exemplary apprenticeships system.

At this time of change, City & Guilds and the National Training Federation for Wales (NTfW) commissioned an independent review of the apprenticeship system in Wales to provide vital insight to help inform Welsh Government policies and support the practical delivery of apprenticeships in this country.

The review was led by David Sherlock and Nicky Perry from Beyond Standards and we have developed a set of recommendations based on the findings for the Welsh Government to set them on the path to apprenticeship success.

  • There needs to be more speed and agility in policy formation and implementation
  • There needs to be better measures of quality with stewardship from a single body
  • For teaching, learning and assessment, there needs to be a clearer picture of what ‘excellent looks like’ with robust performance indicators so there is no doubt for apprenticeship providers in what they should be aiming for.

Above all, apprenticeships must lead to good jobs and career progression, a reduction in skills shortages and improved productivity to help Wales meet its skills challenges.

The report as well as our response to it, offers fresh ideas and a new momentum to the debate about how Wales might provide an exemplary Apprenticeship system for the future. A future that would greatly benefit Welsh working people and employers who choose to base themselves in Wales. Click below to read more about our research, our recommendations and our response to it.

Main report: English (PDF) | Welsh (PDF)

City & Guilds response report: English (PDF) | Welsh (PDF)

OUR THINKING